Age dating sediments

Unlike people, you can’t really guess the age of a rock from looking at it.

Yet, you’ve heard the news: Earth is 4.6 billion years old. That corn cob found in an ancient Native American fire pit is 1,000 years old. Geologic age dating—assigning an age to materials—is an entire discipline of its own.

Before these claims can be considered, a brief explanation of plate tectonics is in order.

The theory of plate tectonics states that the lithosphere, which is the layer of Earth that includes the continental and oceanic crusts, is divided into seven large plates and several smaller ones. Earthquakes and volcanic activity are caused by the movement of plates and interaction at their boundaries.

Unfortunately, glacial sediments are typically difficult to date.

Most methods rely on indirect methods of dating subglacial tills, such as dating organic remains above and below glacial sediments.

One creationist believes that the floor of the ocean provides evidence that the earth is much younger than the generally accepted age of 4.6 billion years.

This paper will provide an explanation of his claim, as well as evidence and arguments provided by mainstream scientists which causes them to reject this young-earth creationist's clock.

Geologists draw on it and other basic principles ( to determine the relative ages of rocks or features such as faults.

Many methods are only useful for a limited period of time (for radiocarbon, for example, 40,000 years is the maximum age possible).

Scientists dating Quaternary glacial sediments in Antarctica most commonly use one of the methods outlined below, depending on what kind of material they want to date and how old it is.

The fact that most of the Earth is covered in water has spurred much interest in the world's oceans.

For many years, scientists have studied the ocean's creatures, the effects of introducing chemicals to the water, and the geologic floor of the world's vast oceans.

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